The Iron Giant

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The Iron Giant
Irongiantposter.jpg
Genre: Animation
Sci-fi
Photography: Color
Running Time: 87 minutes
Country: United States
Release Date: July 31, 1999 (Mann's Chinese Theater)
August 6, 1999 (United States)
Directed by: Brad Bird
Written by: Tim McCanlies
Brad Bird
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Starring: Jennifer Aniston
Harry Connick Jr.
Vin Diesel
James Gammon
Cloris Leachman
John Mahoney
Christopher McDonald
Eli Marienthal
M. Emmet Walsh


The Iron Giant is a 1999 American animated science fiction film using both traditional animation and computer animation, produced by Warner Bros. Feature Animation and directed by Brad Bird in his directorial debut. It is based on the 1968 novel The Iron Man by Ted Hughes (which was published in the United States as The Iron Giant) and was scripted by Tim McCanlies from a story treatment by Bird.

Plot

This is the story of a nine-year-old boy named Hogarth Hughes who makes friends with an innocent giant alien robot that came from outer space. Meanwhile, a paranoid U.S. Government agent named Kent Mansley arrives in town, determined to destroy the giant at all costs. It's up to Hogarth to protect him by keeping him at Dean McCoppin's place in the junkyard.

Why it Rocks

  1. This film launched the career of Brad Bird, the director of this film, would later make even more great animated films like Ratatouille, The Incredibles, and Incredibles 2, helping shape up Brad Bird's love for animation, a love started by working on The Simpsons, and defining animation as more than simple kid's content.
  2. Beautiful animation that mixes traditional animation with computer animation.
  3. One of the film's strongest scenes is where the Giant is forced to stop the missile or everyone in town is mercilessly killed, reciting what Hogarth told him during their first meeting before sacrificing himself to stop said missile.
  4. The Iron Giant, accompanied by the mechanical voice of Vin Diesel, is a lovable and deep character, perfectly summed up by a line from Brad Bird used to pitch the film: "What if a gun had a soul and didn't want to be a gun?".
  5. It balances two plots well together: Hogarth finding and being friendly with The Iron Giant, and the government trying to get rid of it.
  6. Great voice acting, especially from Eli Marienthal, Vin Diesel, Harry Connick Jr., Jennifer Aniston, James Gammon, who were all newcomers for the time.
  7. A very triumphant soundtrack.
  8. Lots of depth and humanity, especially for a Warner Bros. animated film meant for kids.
  9. A lot of memorable lines that spurred from the film's immensely clever and cheesy writing, which anyone can recite today, "Where's the giant, Mansley?"
  10. The U.S. Army as seen in the film is accurately depicted in its mid-late 1950s form, including the choice of vehicles, weapons, and the appearance of a soldier; the latter impressively down to the cut and style of uniform.

Bad Qualities

  1. For a movie with a lot of ideas, it's countered by a short run time of 86 minutes (which was somewhat fixed by the extended edition that featured 2 scenes story-boarded during original production but not animated until sixteen years later in 2015, the same year it received a theatrical re-release).
  2. As mentioned above, some of the dialogue is very cheesy.
  3. The film failed horribly at the box office.

Trivia

  • General Rogard's actor, John Mahoney, passed away in 2018, 19 years after the film was released.
  • Sadly, Ted Hughes (author of the original novel the film was based on) passed away a year before the movie was released. He did, however, live long enough to read the script. Despite its departure from the source material, Hughes was impressed. He expressed his approval in a letter to the studio: "I want to tell you how much I like what Brad Bird has done … He’s made a terrific dramatic situation out of the way he’s developed The Iron Giant. I can’t stop thinking about it."
  • Ted Hughes wrote the novel as a way of comforting his children after the suicide of their mother, poet Sylvia Plath.

External Links