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The French Dispatch

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The French Dispatch
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Genre: Comedy
Drama
Directed By: Wes Anderson
Produced By: Wes Anderson
Jeremy Dawson
Steven Rales
Written By: Wes Anderson
Starring: Benicio del Toro
Adrien Brody
Tilda Swinton
Léa Seydoux
Frances McDormand
Timothée Chalamet
Lyna Khoudri
Jeffrey Wright
Mathieu Amalric
Stephen Park
Bill Murray
Owen Wilson
Cinematography: Robert Yeoman
Distributed By: Searchlight Pictures
Release Date: July 12, 2021 (Cannes)
October 22, 2021 (United States/Limited release)
October 29, 2021 (United States/Wide release)
Runtime: 103 minutes
Country: United States
Language: English
French
Budget: $25 million
Box Office: $46.1 million
Prequel: Isle of Dogs
Sequel: Asteroid City


The French Dispatch of the Liberty, Kansas Evening Sun (known simply as The French Dispatch) is a 2021 American anthology comedy-drama film written and directed by Wes Anderson from a story written by Anderson, Roman Coppola, Hugo Guinness, and Jason Schwartzman. The film features an ensemble cast consisting of Benicio del Toro, Adrien Brody, Tilda Swinton, Léa Seydoux, Frances McDormand, Timothée Chalamet, Lyna Khoudri, Jeffrey Wright, Mathieu Amalric, Stephen Park, Bill Murray and Owen Wilson. The film's supporting cast features several of Anderson's recurring collaborators, including Liev Schreiber, Edward Norton, Willem Dafoe, Saoirse Ronan, Jason Schwartzman, and Anjelica Huston, among others. The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival on July 12, 2021, and was released in the United States on October 22, 2021, following a screening at the 59th New York Film Festival by Searchlight Pictures.

Plot

The film will focus as one of three different storylines with a love letter to journalists set in an outpost of an American newspaper in a fictional 20th-century French city that brings to life a collection of stories published in "The French Dispatch."

Why It Rocks

  1. Its yet another film of Wes Anderson that keeps the charm and did a impressive job for directing it.
  2. Ensemble cast gives very amazing performances from Benicio del Toro, Adrien Brody, Tilda Swinton, Léa Seydoux, Frances McDormand, Timothée Chalamet, Lyna Khoudri, Jeffrey Wright, Mathieu Amalric, Stephen Park, Bill Murray and Owen Wilson. Even supporting cast features several of Anderson's recurring collaborators, including Liev Schreiber, Edward Norton, Willem Dafoe, Saoirse Ronan, Jason Schwartzman, and Anjelica Huston, among others.
  3. The theatrical release poster pays homage for the album cover for Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band by The Beatles.
  4. The comedy, like many Wes Anderson movies, is hilarious and awesome that doesn't overused of gross-up, nor pop-culture references.
  5. Fantastic score of Alexandre Desplat, who is known for being Wes Anderson's current composer.
  6. It connected perfectly three storylines of anthology films, which is useful.

Reception

The French Dispatch received critical acclaim for its craftsmanship, acting, and comedy. On the review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, which categorizes reviews only as positive or negative, 79% of 96 reviews are positive, with an average rating of 7.40/10. The website's critics consensus reads: "A loving ode to the spirit of journalism, The French Dispatch will be most enjoyed by fans of Wes Anderson's meticulously arranged aesthetic." On Metacritic, the film has a weighted average score of 75 out of 100, based on 38 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".

Videos

Gallery

Trivia

  • The movie was originally thought to be a musical, but before the filming began, Wes Anderson denied it.
  • The film's premiere and release was delayed by a year due to the COVID-19 global pandemic.
  • A February 2020 New Yorker piece outlined some of the characters, subjects, and situations depicted in this movie, along with the corresponding New Yorker articles, subjects, and writers that Wes Anderson referenced. These include: Arthur Howitzer, Jr. (Bill Murray), inspired by the New Yorker's founding editor Harold Ross. Herbsaint Sazerac (Owen Wilson), inspired by writer Joseph Mitchell. Julian Cadazio (Adrien Brody), inspired by Lord Duveen, the subject of a 1951 six-part New Yorker profile by S. N. Behrman. Roebuck Wright (Jeffrey Wright), inspired by James Baldwin and A.J. Liebling, who were New Yorker contributors over the years. Lucinda Krementz (Frances McDormand), inspired by Mavis Gallant, who wrote a two-part 1968 piece on the student uprisings in France. This character also shares a last name with Jill Krementz, a photographer whose work has often appeared in the New Yorker (and who is the widow of author Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.).
  • A February 2020 New Yorker piece reported that this movie is set in a fictional French town called "Ennui-sur-Blasé". "Ennui" and "blasé" are both English words (albeit both words that originate from the French) that mean roughly the same thing: a world-weary boredom, apathy, and sophistication. It is fairly common for French place names to contain the word "sur" ("on") between two other words as a geographic descriptor; for example, the French Riviera village name "Beaulieu-sur-Mer" translates as "beautiful place on the sea". So if it were a real place name, "Ennui-sur-Blasé" would mean, more or less, "Boredom-on-Apathy".


Wes Anderson
Movies: Bottle Rocket - Rushmore - The Royal Tenenbaums - The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou - The Darjeeling Limited - Fantastic Mr. Fox - Moonrise Kingdom - The Grand Budapest Hotel - Isle of Dogs - The French Dispatch

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