Raging Bull (1980)

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Raging Bull (1980)
Raging Bull (1980).png2.jpg
Genre: Biographical

Black-and-white
Action
Drama
Wrestling

Photography: Michael Chapman
Running Time: 129 minutes
Country: United States
Release Date: December 19, 1980 (United States)

November 14, 1980 (New York City)

Directed by: Martin Scorsese
Written by: Paul Schrader

Mardik Martin

Distributed by: United Artists
Starring: Robert De Niro

Joe Pesci
Cathy Moriarty
Nicholas Colasanto
Theresa Saldana
Frank Vincent
Johnny Barnes
Martin Scorsese

Raging Bull is a 1980 American biographical, black-and-white sports drama film directed by Martin Scorsese, produced by Robert Chartoff and Irwin Winkler and adapted by Paul Schrader and Mardik Martinfrom Jake LaMotta's memoir Raging Bull: My Story. It stars Robert De Niro as Jake LaMotta, an Italian American middleweight-boxer whose self-destructive and obsessive rage, sexual jealousy, and animalistic appetite destroyed his relationship with his wife and family.

Plot

In a brief scene in 1964, an aging, overweight Italian American, Jake LaMotta, practices a comedy routine. In 1941, LaMotta is in a major boxing match against Jimmy Reeves, where he received his first loss. Jake's brother, Joey LaMotta, discusses a potential shot for the middleweight title with one of his Mafia connections, Salvy Batts. Some time thereafter, Jake spots a fifteen-year-old girl named Vickie at an open-air swimming pool in his Bronx neighborhood. He eventually pursues a relationship with her, even though he is already married. In 1943, Jake defeats Sugar Ray Robinson, and has a rematch three weeks later. Despite the fact that Jake dominates Robinson during the bout, the judges surprisingly rule in favor of Robinson and Joey feels Robinson won only because he was enlisting into the Army the following week. By 1945, Jake marries Vickie.

Jake constantly worries about Vickie having feelings for other men, particularly when she makes an off-hand comment about Tony Janiro, Jake's opponent in his next fight. His jealousy is evident when he brutally defeats Janiro in front of the local Mob boss, Tommy Como, and Vickie. As Joey discusses the victory with journalists at the Copacabana, he is distracted by seeing Vickie approach a table with Salvy and his crew. Joey speaks with Vickie, who says she is giving up on his brother. Blaming Salvy, Joey viciously attacks him in a fight that spills outside of the club. Como later orders them to apologize, and has Joey tell Jake that if he wants a chance at the championship title, which Como controls, he will have to take a dive first. In a match against Billy Fox, after briefly pummeling his opponent, Jake does not even bother to put up a fight. He is suspended shortly thereafter from the board on suspicion of throwing the fight, though he realizes the error of his judgment when it is too late. He is eventually reinstated, and in 1949, wins the middleweight championship title against Marcel Cerdan.

A year later, Jake asks Joey if he fought with Salvy at the Copacabana because of Vickie. Jake then asks if Joey had an affair with her; Joey refuses to answer, insults Jake, and leaves. Jake directly asks Vickie about the affair, and when she hides from him in the bathroom, he breaks down the door, prompting her to sarcastically state that she had sex with the entire neighborhood (including his brother, Salvy, and Tommy Como). Jake angrily walks to Joey's house, with Vickie following him, and assaults Joey in front of his wife and children. After defending his championship belt in a grueling fifteen-round bout against Laurent Dauthuille in 1950, he makes a call to his brother after the fight, but when Joey assumes Salvy is on the other end and starts insulting and cursing at him, Jake says nothing and hangs up. Estranged from Joey, Jake's career begins to decline slowly and he eventually loses his title to Sugar Ray Robinson in their final encounter in 1951.

By 1956, Jake and his family have moved to Miami. After he stays out all night at his new nightclub there, Vickie tells him she wants a divorce (which she has been planning since his retirement) as well as full custody of their kids. She also threatens to call the cops if he comes anywhere near them. He is later arrested for introducing under-age girls to men in his club. He tries and fails to bribe his way out of his criminal case using the jewels from his championship belt instead of selling the belt itself. In 1957, he goes to jail, sorrowfully questioning his misfortune and crying in despair. Upon returning to New York City in 1958, he happens upon his estranged brother Joey, who forgives him, but is elusive. Returning to the opening scene in 1964, Jake refers to the "I coulda been a contender" scene from the 1954 film On the Waterfront starring Marlon Brando, complaining that his brother should have been there for him but is also keen enough to give himself some slack. After a stagehand informs him that the auditorium where he is about to perform is crowded, Jake starts to chant "I'm the boss" while shadowboxing.

Why It Rocks

  1. "Raging Bull" is the story of former boxing middleweight champion Jake LaMotta, and his penchant for self-destruction. LaMotta is not in the least a nice guy. He is well, a jerk, who eventually drives any and everyone who has ever cared about him out of his life. He evolved from a lean, trim boxer to an overweight loser who owns a night club.
  2. Martin Scorsese (arguably America's greatest filmmaker) was reluctant to make the film, nearly about to call it quits until his good friend (arguably America's greatest film actor) Robert De Niro, approached him with a book he had read titled "Raging Bull" which the film is based on.
  3. Naturally, Scorsese's direction is flawless, and Thelma Schoonmaker's editing will pretty much speak for itself.
  4. The film deals with controversial topics of self-destruction, obsessive rage, and sex in the most mature ways possible.
  5. The black-and-white (or tinted monochrome) was an ingenious touch, creating a visually pleasing and distinct aesthetic that holds up for ages.
  6. Joe Pesci is excellent as Jake's brother Joey as is Cathy Moriarty as Jake's long suffering wife. 
  7. The film often considered Scorsese's magnum opus and one of the greatest films ever made. 
  8. The film is certainly one of the most intense films Scorsese has directed, and one of the most important of his career. Along with "Taxi Driver", it is an iconic motion picture that will stand the test of time for years and years to come. 
  9. It is very relatable to many people who have similar personalities and problems to LaMotta.

Bad Qualities

  1. This film was criminally robbed of 1980's Best Picture and Best Director Academy Awards, by "Ordinary People", another one of those dysfunctional family dramas even though it did win Best Actor for De Niro.